Skip to content

Extracts from my book. “A Thailand diary”

Originally posted on Matt.Owens.Rees; Thailand Writer:

Extracts from A Thailand Diary

9 January

Murder most foul.

Our soi (lane) is single track, so we could not get the car out when the police vehicle parked outside our neighbour’s house. And you don’t ask armed police officers, anywhere in the world, to move their car for you. They park where they want to park.

A crowd had started to gather outside the house. The locals wanted to know what was going on, and they were waiting around to gather whatever snippets of information or gossip were available.

Ratchanee told me that one of the brothers in the house was dead. There had been some heavy drinking the night before and the men’s mother had heard some shouting downstairs. She had thought nothing of it. In the morning, the mother found her son lying in a pool of blood.

The police were now investigating a murder. They will…

View original 1,979 more words

The End of a Life

The End of a Life

The End of a Life.

Some views on Thai Democracy

 

 

 

A well thought out article and some good points from a poster on New Mandal. But using words like “spurious” and “furiously battle” at the beginning shows a western rather than a Thai outlook on democracy. (Yingluck is certainly not taking a furious approach, far from it)

Mr Vadera says: “In a democracy regardless of for whomever we vote, we consent that the winner of that election will represent the whole of that electorate. However if we do not have the means to withhold consent, it is impossible to give consent.”

Absolutely true, but Thais view it slightly differently. Thais share a respect for both the democracy given by their constitution and their respect for the feudalistic class system. I believe they will find a balance that suits this cultural background and resolve that dichotomy. It will take time. Thaksin paved the way to some extent. Yingluck is working more than her brother ever did or would WITH the networks (the elite, sections of the army, etc)

Without understanding Thai culture and thinking, most foreigners can not think outside the western model of democracy which frustrates Thais. It is why some foreign critics of the monarchy are so detested by Thais. For their (to Thais, one -sided)views of course but also for the rather colonial way foreigners sometimes discuss them.

Thai academics will listen but not be lectured at particularly if that is seen as being disrespectful to the monarchy ( and by extention, disrespectful to Thailand and the Thais)

Robin Vadera’s article is thought provoking and I’m glad I read it. It could be a powerful basis for developing a strategy that could work.

(Like many, I am ambivalent on New Mandala. There’s some good stuff on there  Its problem is they tend – or their posters tend – to flame any poster that disagrees, however constructively, Stray from the perceived wisdom of their agenda and woe betide you. Letting people have theirr “democratic” say seems to have eluded them. Which is odd given their stated aim of wanting free discource)

Perhaps following too much Henry Ford’s dictum. “You can have any colour you want so long as it’s black!

that, 

 

Aside

#MH370

The hunt for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is shifting some 680 miles north as new data analysis shows the plane may not have traveled so far south. New radar analysis indicates that the jet was traveling faster than previously thought

The search area for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 shifted some 680 miles to the north on Friday after Australia said it had a “credible lead” on where the plane went down based on a new analysis of radar data. But even as a New Zealand military plane quickly spotted objects in the new search area that officials said could be connected to the missing flight, Australian authorities said it likely take until Saturday for ships to arrive in the area and determine if the objects are debris from the Boeing 777.

“This is the normal business of search and rescue operations—that new information comes to light, refined analyses take you to a different place,” John Young, general manager of the emergency response division the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, told reporters. “I don’t count the original work as a waste of time.”

The latest information is based on ongoing analysis of radar data from the area between the South China Sea and the Strait of Malacca, before the plane carrying 239 people vanished during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8. A massive international hunt for the plane has followed in recent weeks, making for the longest disappearance in modern aviation history. Malaysian officials said earlier this week that they had determined the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean and that no one survived, but family members of the passengers continue to press for answers and closure.

The new radar analysis, provided by the international investigation team in Malaysia, indicates the 200-ton, twin-engine jetliner was traveling faster than previously thought, burning up more fuel and cutting the possible distance traveled on its southward bearing into the Indian Ocean.

David Brewster, a visiting fellow at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University, told Reuters it was surprising that the new data analysis only emerged now. “The Malaysians have never really had to handle a search and rescue operation of this nature before so it is maybe complicated by lack of experience,” he said.

The new search area measures some 123,000 sq. miles (319,000 sq km) and is situated 1,150 miles (1,850 km) west of Perth, Australia. All six search vessels are currently relocating to this area and were set to be joined by 10 aircraft throughout the course of Friday. Although the new zone is only one-fifth of the size of the previous area, it is still huge—roughly the size of New Mexico.

Conditions for searching have improved, too. “It is a different ballpark,” Erik van Sebille, an oceanographer of New South Wales University, told the New York Times. “Where they are searching now is more like a subtropical ocean. It is not nearly as bad as the southern Indian Ocean, which should make the search easier.”

Hours of staring out over the vast expanse of featureless ocean is taking its toll on airborne investigators. “It is incredibly fatiguing work,” Flight Lt. Stephen Graham told the Associated Press. “If it’s bright and glaring obviously sunglasses help, but there’s only so much you can do.”

Australia, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, China and the U.S. are all collaborating in the hunt for MH 370, which vanished soon after taking off from Kuala Lumpur, sparking a massive search for the jet across Southeast Asia.

Investigators believe the plane carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew members went down in the southern part of the Indian Ocean and are continuing to analyze satellite imagery to pinpoint potential debris. Some 300 objects that may have come from the aircraft have been spotted by satellites, but so far none have been positively identified. Poor weather conditions in the search area have hampered air and sea efforts to closely inspect any of the objects.

“We will continue and we shall not look back,” Malaysian Defense Minister and acting Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein told a press briefing on Friday afternoon.

Anger at the Malaysian authorities’ handling of the disaster has been widespread, especially from relatives of the 153 Chinese nationals on board. Some of China’s largest travel agencies have banned sales of Malaysia Airlines’ tickets in response.

Conversely, a backlash against this criticism is now stirring across social media in Malaysia. Netizens are furious at perceived hypocrisy from Beijing officials demanding greater transparency in light of myriad official cover-ups of accidents and atrocities in the Middle Kingdom, including the Kunming Railway Station massacre earlier this month.

#MH370 New Radar Evidence

The hunt for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is shifting some 680 miles north as new data analysis shows the plane may not have traveled so far south. New radar analysis indicates that the jet was traveling faster than previously thought

The search area for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 shifted some 680 miles to the north on Friday after Australia said it had a “credible lead” on where the plane went down based on a new analysis of radar data. But even as a New Zealand military plane quickly spotted objects in the new search area that officials said could be connected to the missing flight, Australian authorities said it likely take until Saturday for ships to arrive in the area and determine if the objects are debris from the Boeing 777.

“This is the normal business of search and rescue operations—that new information comes to light, refined analyses take you to a different place,” John Young, general manager of the emergency response division the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, told reporters. “I don’t count the original work as a waste of time.”

The latest information is based on ongoing analysis of radar data from the area between the South China Sea and the Strait of Malacca, before the plane carrying 239 people vanished during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8. A massive international hunt for the plane has followed in recent weeks, making for the longest disappearance in modern aviation history. Malaysian officials said earlier this week that they had determined the plane went down in the southern Indian Ocean and that no one survived, but family members of the passengers continue to press for answers and closure.

The new radar analysis, provided by the international investigation team in Malaysia, indicates the 200-ton, twin-engine jetliner was traveling faster than previously thought, burning up more fuel and cutting the possible distance traveled on its southward bearing into the Indian Ocean.

David Brewster, a visiting fellow at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University, told Reuters it was surprising that the new data analysis only emerged now. “The Malaysians have never really had to handle a search and rescue operation of this nature before so it is maybe complicated by lack of experience,” he said.

The new search area measures some 123,000 sq. miles (319,000 sq km) and is situated 1,150 miles (1,850 km) west of Perth, Australia. All six search vessels are currently relocating to this area and were set to be joined by 10 aircraft throughout the course of Friday. Although the new zone is only one-fifth of the size of the previous area, it is still huge—roughly the size of New Mexico.

Conditions for searching have improved, too. “It is a different ballpark,” Erik van Sebille, an oceanographer of New South Wales University, told the New York Times. “Where they are searching now is more like a subtropical ocean. It is not nearly as bad as the southern Indian Ocean, which should make the search easier.”

Hours of staring out over the vast expanse of featureless ocean is taking its toll on airborne investigators. “It is incredibly fatiguing work,” Flight Lt. Stephen Graham told the Associated Press. “If it’s bright and glaring obviously sunglasses help, but there’s only so much you can do.”

Australia, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, China and the U.S. are all collaborating in the hunt for MH 370, which vanished soon after taking off from Kuala Lumpur, sparking a massive search for the jet across Southeast Asia.

Investigators believe the plane carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew members went down in the southern part of the Indian Ocean and are continuing to analyze satellite imagery to pinpoint potential debris. Some 300 objects that may have come from the aircraft have been spotted by satellites, but so far none have been positively identified. Poor weather conditions in the search area have hampered air and sea efforts to closely inspect any of the objects.

“We will continue and we shall not look back,” Malaysian Defense Minister and acting Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein told a press briefing on Friday afternoon.

Anger at the Malaysian authorities’ handling of the disaster has been widespread, especially from relatives of the 153 Chinese nationals on board. Some of China’s largest travel agencies have banned sales of Malaysia Airlines’ tickets in response.

Conversely, a backlash against this criticism is now stirring across social media in Malaysia. Netizens are furious at perceived hypocrisy from Beijing officials demanding greater transparency in light of myriad official cover-ups of accidents and atrocities in the Middle Kingdom, including the Kunming Railway Station massacre earlier this month.

7 Questions Answered about MH370′s Disappearance. from The Guardian

7 Questions Answered about MH370's Disappearance. from The Guardian.

JamesRadcliffe.com

James Radcliffe, Musician. Music, Blog, Pictures, Live, News...

BKKBase Random Grumblings

Just another WordPress.com site

Greta van der Rol

Greta van der Rol's author site

Thought Scratchings...

...The bit your brain can't itch, served in a packet of alternative pig shit.

2Summers

An American in Quirky Johannesburg

East of Málaga

Tales from the AUTHENTIC Costa del Sol .... and beyond

Without an H

Photography from south-east Asia by Jon Sanwell

Zeebra Designs & Destinations

An Artist's Eyes Never Rest

50 Year Project

My challenge to visit 192 countries, read 1,001 books, and watch the top 100 movies

CNX Art Connex

Chiang Mai, Thailand

umapornthongtree's Blog

A great WordPress.com site

Espresso Shorts

Musings from the world's coffee shops

tvreviewsbyvictorlewissmith

Just another WordPress.com site

Projectarama

Exploring the world and sharing details on community projects that I come across

mjbee45

The greatest WordPress.com site in all the land!

Harry-in-Chiangmai

Harry Nieuwland's Blog

drdalsveryslowworldtour

A fine WordPress.com site

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,062 other followers