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Thailand Houses

12/02/2015

A teak house on stilts. The structure on the right is a sala where you can sit and enjoy the view over the lake. There is a wooden stairway down to the water’s edge.

Construction costs for teak houses are high as there is now a limited supply of teak due to restrictions on harvesting timber from the rain forests.

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A less traditional style of house but with the usual wide overhangs on the eaves to protect from the hot rays of the sun. Note the lack of guttering on the roof. A tell-tale sign that this home is owned by a Thai, not a westerner.

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A less expensive home, the kind owned by the average middle class Thai

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Corrugated or asbestos roofs make the inside rooms hot in the daytime but are the cheapest form of construction. A house favoured by a working class family.

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A farmer’s house. His family will all help working the farm. Any casual labour he may employ would live in a one-room “apartment”. We’ll see examples later.

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Very modern. Very expensive. The sort of house upwardly mobile Thais would have an architect design.

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Another farmer’s house in a rice paddy.

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A three or four bed-roomed house on an estate or project. Could be Thai or foreigner owned. A typical choice for westerners, many of whom prefer to live in gated communities with other farangs (expat foreigners)

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A straw roofed home in the countryside

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A condominium block. A foreigner can own an apartment in a condo in Thailand provided that 51% of the other condos are owned by Thais.

A westerner can freely sell whenever he chooses but may find he is restricted to whom he can sell because of the 51% rule.

If he succeeds in finding a Thai buyer he will get about 30% to 40% less than if he were fortunate in selling to a fellow farang. The Thai land law ensures it’s a buyer’s market as far as westerners are concerned.

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Interiors of Thai and farang homes can be quite lavish. But the majority of Thais cannot aspire to this level of luxury.

 

 

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Houses along a canal.

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Thais like colour.

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Bangkok tower blocks overlooking the Chao Praya river

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This home is owned by the local pooyaibaan, village mayor.  The family run a small food store at the front of the living quarters.

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You can see the stairway to the living and bedroom areas in the background.

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Families tend to live in close proximity to one another. Married couples are given or buy a home on the family compound.

Not unusual to find three generations living like this. Fleeing the nest on marriage or when one gets older is not typically Thai.

But if children do move for job reasons they still keep in touch and support financially. These photos show three houses.

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Another compound but better maintained.

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A community of farmers’ houses.

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These are single bed-roomed homes rented by those working away from the family home.

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Monks live in small kootees within the grounds of the local temple (wat). Again a spartan single room.

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Four kootees

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The communal toilet

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The living quarters are at the back of the main wat buildings. The abbot would have a slightly larger room  but nothing elaborate.

 

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At the Dhamakaya wat just outside Bangkok, the abbot’s kootee lies in extensive grounds shielded from view. But that is a very rich Buddhist temple, untypical of other Thai temples. I was not able to take any photos.

 

I am upgrading my blog to include more enhanced features which I hope will make the posts more interesting for readers. The site is not completely finished yet: some tweaking needs to be done and tested but you can take a look at http://www.matt-owens-rees.com         (That’s a dash not an underscore)

Hope you continue to enjoy these blog posts on Thailand topics. Comments are always welcome.

 

Matt Owens Rees

 

 

 

 

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One Comment
  1. Matt Owens Rees permalink

    Reblogged this on Matt.Owens.Rees; Thailand Writer and commented:

    http://www.matt-owens-rees.com :my improved blog is 90% finished. Fully up and running by 1 March

    Like

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